Vacancies

 

Communications and media officer

Communications and media officer

Hours: 21 a week

A number of our staff work flexibly and/or remotely. Please talk to us at the interview stage about the flexibility you need. We are open to various possible working arrangements for the candidate who is the right fit for the role. 

Salary: £28,500 pro-rata

Deadline: 2 Feb

About the Centre

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing’s vision is of a future where the wellbeing of people and communities improves year on year and wellbeing inequalities are reduced.

The Centre believes that improving wellbeing should be the ultimate objective of policy and community action.

The Centre’s mission is to develop and share robust, accessible and useful evidence that governments, businesses, communities and people use to improve wellbeing across the UK.

Approach

  • Independent: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing acts as an impartial convener of people with different views and perspectives, and speaks up about findings – both when they confirm accepted wisdom and when they challenge it.
  • Evidence-based: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to be evidence-based in what it does. The Centre believes that decision making should be informed by the best possible evidence, and that everyone has a role in contributing their findings on what works. The Centre brings together the best evidence from wellbeing research to help guide actions that improve people’s lives. 
  • Collaborative: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing works in partnership, where possible, building on and using the best work in the field wherever it’s done. The Centre adds value by connecting academics, organisations, decision makers and individuals in meaningful and productive conversation and action.
  • Practical: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is focused on what organisations can do to improve wellbeing, producing evidence that is actively useful and valuing learning from practice. The Centre listens to a wide range of people, and share evidence in ways that is accessible, relevant and useful.
  • Open: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to encourage new ideas and approaches to its mission. The Centre recognises that there are different views about wellbeing, and that the discipline is evolving – therefore welcomes this diversity. The Centre is open to what it can learn from a range of approaches and findings. 
  • Transparent: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to be as open and transparent as possible about its work, so that others can do it too.
  • Iterative: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to learn from experience, and encourages others to do the same by investing in new approaches to understanding and improving wellbeing. The Centre believes that creating robust evidence is a journey and that each step is worthwhile. In so doing, it supports others on their journey so we can build better evidence of wellbeing together.

We work with a network of world-leading wellbeing researchers, policy makers and practitioners to bring together the best available evidence on wellbeing, and communicate it in a way that is accessible, timely and useful. 

Further information about the Centre is available on our website.

The What Works network

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is part of the What Works Centre network. The What Works Centres have been set up as independent centres with the aim to bridge between research knowledge (evidence) and practice for key decision-makers in the UK. This initiative aims to improve the way Government and other organisations adopt and generate evidence for more effective decision-making. 

The overall aim of all Centres is to translate and make the best available evidence accessible, implementable and measurable, whilst continuing to contribute to evidence generation through assessing impact and learning from the implementation and adaptation of the existing evidence.

About the role

We are looking for a digital and media-savvy communications officer to join our friendly team. You’ll help implement our communications strategies to build awareness of the Centre’s work. We’ve spent five years carrying out high quality research with top UK universities, and other organisations, to develop evidence on what works for wellbeing. Now we want to make sure our media work is as successful as our social media engagement.

The ideal candidate will be someone with excellent organisation skills who can manage our thriving weekly schedule, and work across multiple projects within the Centre. You’ll have a proven track record of success of turning research into media coverage. You’ll also be confident at organising events, both online and in-person.  You will excel at writing and editing, whether for blogs, press releases, or policy briefs.

Responsibilities

  • Working with internal and external stakeholders to help plan communications and PR activities for the Centre’s research and other resources.
  • Managing our busy communications calendar and tracker, including spotting opportunities to maximise exposure to Centre products.
  • Support message development, and social media content creation, including using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop (training can be provided for this software).
  • Develop and disseminate public relations materials that increase our visibility for our target audiences in local government, civil service, charity, researchers, and business.
  • Build and maintain relationships with journalists and bloggers that will help advance our work.
  • Horizon scan for events and current issues to help spotlight our work in relevant ways.
  • Ensure digital marketing content aligns with our brand’s identity and message, and assist with social campaigns as needed.
  • Support with communications aspects of Centre events across the UK.
  • Use Google Analytics, including Google tag manager, and Twitter analytics to carry out monitoring and reporting for the Centre’s website (training can be provided).

Essential criteria

  •       An organised approach to your work.
  •       Proven success securing national and sector-specific media coverage and/or blog features – writing press releases, media briefings, and pitching to journalists.
  •       Excellent partnership working skills.
  •       Ability to write compellingly, and for a variety of audiences.
  •       Event organising experience – whether workshops, webinars, or conferences.
  •       Experience creating content for social media, specifically Twitter.

 Desirable

  •       Evidence of having turned research findings into engaging news and feature items
  •       Experience with Adobe Indesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop
  •       Comfortable using Google Analytics to draw information on insights into user behaviour
To apply

Please send your CV + cover letter to info@whatworkswellbeing.org

Deadline Sunday 2 February 

Board Director

Board Director

We are particularly interested in candidates with specialist knowledge and experience in the areas of  Human Resources, Government or Public Health expertise.

Over the next few years, the Centre expects to build on the evidence it has produced by doing more work to assist voluntary organisations, local authorities and others with implementing the lessons, and assessing their impact on wellbeing.  We have a substantial grant from the National Lottery Community Fund, and interest from other bodies in government and business. We are now looking for new Board Directors who can help the Centre develop on the next phase of its journey, in particular people with experience in Finance, Human Resources, Government or Public Health.

Role description

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is led by a voluntary Board of Directors. We are seeking to recruit two new Company Directors to join our current Board of Directors. We are looking for individuals with one – or a combination – of the following areas of expertise: Human Resources, Government and Local Government, Public Health, Communications, Finance. 

We are committed to building a board benefitting from a diverse range of voices, and strongly encourage applications from women and ethnic minority candidates. 

About the Centre

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing’s vision is of a future where the wellbeing of people and communities improves year on year and wellbeing inequalities are reduced.

The Centre believes that improving wellbeing should be the ultimate objective of policy and community action.

The Centre’s mission is to develop and share robust, accessible and useful evidence that governments, businesses, communities and people use to improve wellbeing across the UK.

Approach

  • Independent: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing acts as an impartial convener of people with different views and perspectives, and speaks up about findings – both when they confirm accepted wisdom and when they challenge it.

  • Evidence based: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to be evidence-based in what it does. The Centre believes that decision making should be informed by the best possible evidence, and that everyone has a role in contributing their findings on what works. The Centre brings together the best evidence from wellbeing research to help guide actions that improve people’s lives. 

  • Collaborative: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing works in partnership, where possible, building on and using the best work in the field wherever it’s done. The Centre adds value by connecting academics, organisations, decision makers and individuals in meaningful and productive conversation and action.

  • Practical: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is focused on what organisations can do to improve wellbeing, producing evidence that is actively useful and valuing learning from practice. The Centre listens to a wide range of people, and share evidence in ways that is accessible, relevant and useful.

  • Open: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to encourage new ideas and approaches to its mission. The Centre recognises that there are different views about wellbeing, and that the discipline is evolving – therefore welcomes this diversity. The Centre is open to what it can learn from a range of approaches and findings. 

  • Transparent: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to be as open and transparent as possible about its work, so that others can do it too.

  • Iterative: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to learn from experience, and encourages others to do the same by investing in new approaches to understanding and improving wellbeing. The Centre believes that creating robust evidence is a journey and that each step is worthwhile. In so doing, it supports others on their journey so we can build better evidence of wellbeing together.

We work with a network of world-leading wellbeing researchers, policy makers and practitioners to bring together the best available evidence on wellbeing, and communicate it in a way that is accessible, timely and useful. 

Further information about the Centre is available on our website.

The What works network

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is part of the What Works Centre network. The What Works Centres have been set up as independent centres with the aim to bridge between research knowledge (evidence) and practice for key decision-makers in the UK. This initiative aims to improve the way Government and other organisations adopt and generate evidence for more effective decision-making. 

The overall aim of all Centres is to translate and make the best available evidence accessible, implementable and measurable, whilst continuing to contribute to evidence generation through assessing impact and learning from the implementation and adaptation of the existing evidence.

THE BOARD

The Board is the ultimate decision maker, as outlined in the Centre’s Articles of Association. The Board is responsible for working closely with the Executive Director and the relevant team to develop and agree a strategy for the organisation, and ensure that a) any activities and executive decisions are made in the best interest of the organisation, its stakeholders and the wider public, b) any activities and executive decisions contribute to achieving the organisational purpose and aims, and c) that these are delivered effectively and sustainably.

The Directors will support and work in partnership with the Chair and other Board members to achieve the organisation’s aims, and to set direction, policy and plans. In particular they will:

  • Help to develop strategy and business plans for delivering the Centre’s core functions as a “What Works Centre”, and support the development of new business.

  • Act as effective ambassadors for the Centre, ensuring excellent relationships are built and maintained with current and potential stakeholders and partners. 

  • Uphold good governance practices and performance management, ensuring that the Centre has proper controls, systems and processes in place.

  • Ensure the needs and interests of users, stakeholders, and the public are at the heart of the Centre’s work.

RESPONSIBILITIES   

It is the responsibility of Directors to: 

  • Understand The What Works Centre for Wellbeing’s aims and objectives as set out in the Memorandum and Articles of Association and that it operates in accordance with the Articles.

  • Ensure that The What Works Centre for Wellbeing operates within the law as Community Interest Company.

  • Attend and contribute to meetings of the Board of Directors and attending events.

  • Comment on papers in writing if unable to attend meetings. 

  • Assist the Board and Executive Director in advancing the objectives of The What Works Centre for Wellbeing and in furthering fundraising initiatives by meeting and communicating with potential supporters where no conflict of interest is involved.

  • Maintain a governance perspective by ensuring that the Board:

    • Establishes the company’s strategic direction and goals;

    • Understands, questions and acts upon the financial and other monitoring information presented to it;

    • Defines the boundaries of management authority;

    • Contributes to the development of the long term Strategic Plan; 

    • Delegates to the Executive Director the implementation of its decisions, plans and budgets;

    • Monitors key performance indicators on a regular basis. 

  • Represent the Board’s agreed position when speaking publicly on behalf of the Centre.

  • Support the Executive Director and other staff in carrying out their work when requested.

SKILLS AND EXPERTISE

We aim to achieve a balanced board of trustees, in terms of skills, reach and representation, so that, as a group, they bring a diverse range of perspectives and backgrounds.

Essential skills and expertise

Leadership and team working 

  • Understanding of the issues involved in leading organisations and working as part of a multi-disciplinary board or committee

  • Ability to act as an effective ambassador for the Centre

Good Governance 

  • Commitment to ensure the needs and interests of users, stakeholders and the public are at the heart of how the organisation structures itself and conducts its business

  • Understanding of the principles and practice of good governance

  • High integrity, commitment to equality of opportunity 

Wellbeing

  • Broad understanding of issues relating to wellbeing, including an understanding of the diversity of the UK population and factors affecting different people’s wellbeing

Methodological 

  • Commitment to improving the use of evidence in driving public policy and practice and specifically to the principles of the What Works Centres 

  • Demonstrable commitment to spreading the use of high impact evaluation 

Desired skills and expertise

Wellbeing

  • Expertise in one or more aspects of policy or practice relating to wellbeing e.g. work, learning, culture, sport, community, social capital, built/natural environment, governance, physical and mental health, heritage 

  • Experience of delivering wellbeing interventions and approaches   

  • Experience using services that contribute to wellbeing 

Cross sector, cross disciplinary and UK wide 

  • Relevant experience across the four countries of the UK

  • Relevant experience across public, private and VCSE sectors  

Business and organisational development 

  • Experience of running and growing an organisation including legal, commercial, operational, financial, communications 

  • Understanding of the principles and methods for successfully seeking funding from diverse sources

HOW TO APPLY

Applicants should prepare a short statement setting out their reasons for wishing to be considered for the role of Board Director/Treasurer and the skills/qualities they would bring to the organisation.  Statements should not exceed two pages in length and must be accompanied by a curriculum vitae. Applications should be sent by email for the attention of the Chair, Dr Paul Litchfield, at info@whatworkswellbeing.org by Sunday 2nd February 2020.

 

Board Director - Treasurer

Board Director – treasurer

Over the next few years, the Centre expects to build on the evidence it has produced by doing more work to assist voluntary organisations, local authorities and others with implementing the lessons, and assessing their impact on wellbeing.  We have a substantial grant from the National Lottery Community Fund, and interest from other bodies in government and business. We are now looking for new Board Directors who can help the Centre develop on the next phase of its journey, in particular people with experience in Finance, Human Resources, Government or Public Health.

Role description

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is led by a voluntary Board of Directors. We are seeking to recruit a new Treasurer as part of our Board of Directors. 

We are committed to building a board benefitting from a diverse range of voices, and strongly encourage applications from women and ethnic minority candidates. 

About the Centre

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing’s vision is of a future where the wellbeing of people and communities improves year on year and wellbeing inequalities are reduced.

The Centre believes that improving wellbeing should be the ultimate objective of policy and community action.

The Centre’s mission is to develop and share robust, accessible and useful evidence that governments, businesses, communities and people use to improve wellbeing across the UK.

Approach

  • Independent: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing acts as an impartial convener of people with different views and perspectives, and speaks up about findings – both when they confirm accepted wisdom and when they challenge it.
  • Evidence based: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to be evidence-based in what it does. The Centre believes that decision making should be informed by the best possible evidence, and that everyone has a role in contributing their findings on what works. The Centre brings together the best evidence from wellbeing research to help guide actions that improve people’s lives. 
  • Collaborative: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing works in partnership, where possible, building on and using the best work in the field wherever it’s done. The Centre adds value by connecting academics, organisations, decision makers and individuals in meaningful and productive conversation and action.
  • Practical: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is focused on what organisations can do to improve wellbeing, producing evidence that is actively useful and valuing learning from practice. The Centre listens to a wide range of people, and share evidence in ways that is accessible, relevant and useful.
  • Open: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to encourage new ideas and approaches to its mission. The Centre recognises that there are different views about wellbeing, and that the discipline is evolving – therefore welcomes this diversity. The Centre is open to what it can learn from a range of approaches and findings. 
  • Transparent: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to be as open and transparent as possible about its work, so that others can do it too.
  • Iterative: The What Works Centre for Wellbeing aims to learn from experience, and encourages others to do the same by investing in new approaches to understanding and improving wellbeing. The Centre believes that creating robust evidence is a journey and that each step is worthwhile. In so doing, it supports others on their journey so we can build better evidence of wellbeing together.

We work with a network of world-leading wellbeing researchers, policy makers and practitioners to bring together the best available evidence on wellbeing, and communicate it in a way that is accessible, timely and useful. 

Further information about the Centre is available on our website.

The What works network

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is part of the What Works Centre network. The What Works Centres have been set up as independent centres with the aim to bridge between research knowledge (evidence) and practice for key decision-makers in the UK. This initiative aims to improve the way Government and other organisations adopt and generate evidence for more effective decision-making. 

The overall aim of all Centres is to translate and make the best available evidence accessible, implementable and measurable, whilst continuing to contribute to evidence generation through assessing impact and learning from the implementation and adaptation of the existing evidence.

THE BOARD

The Board is the ultimate decision maker, as outlined in the Centre’s Articles of Association. The Board is responsible for working closely with the Executive Director and the relevant team to develop and agree a strategy for the organisation, and ensure that a) any activities and executive decisions are made in the best interest of the organisation, its stakeholders and the wider public, b) any activities and executive decisions contribute to achieving the organisational purpose and aims, and c) that these are delivered effectively and sustainably.

The Directors will support and work in partnership with the Chair and other Board members to achieve the organisation’s aims, and to set direction, policy and plans. In particular they will:

  • Help to develop strategy and business plans for delivering the Centre’s core functions as a “What Works Centre”, and support the development of new business.
  • Act as effective ambassadors for the Centre, ensuring excellent relationships are built and maintained with current and potential stakeholders and partners. 
  • Uphold good governance practices and performance management, ensuring that the Centre has proper controls, systems and processes in place.
  • Ensure the needs and interests of users, stakeholders, and the public are at the heart of the Centre’s work.

RESPONSIBILITIES   

The treasurer will:

  • Oversee the financial affairs of the Centre on behalf of the board 
  • Monitor and report on the financial health of the organisation.
  • Work with the executive team to produce  financial reports to the board and the annual accounts.
  • Chair the Finance Sub-committee 
  • Ensure the committee receives regular reports on the financial position (balance sheet, cash flow, fundraising performance etc).
  • Work with the executive team to produce an annual budget, and work with the Chair to ensure proper board consideration in time for adoption at the last meeting of the previous financial year.
  • Ensure proper records are kept and that effective financial procedures and controls are in place, 
  • Lead for the board on appointing and liaising with auditors or independent examiner.

SKILLS AND EXPERTISE

We aim to achieve a balanced board of trustees, in terms of skills, reach and representation, so that, as a group, they bring a diverse range of perspectives and backgrounds.

Essential skills and expertise

Leadership and team working 

  • Understanding of the issues involved in leading organisations and working as part of a multi-disciplinary board or committee
  • Ability to act as an effective ambassador for the Centre

Good Governance 

  • Commitment to ensure the needs and interests of users, stakeholders and the public are at the heart of how the organisation structures itself and conducts its business
  • Understanding of the principles and practice of good governance
  • High integrity, commitment to equality of opportunity

Wellbeing

  • Broad understanding of issues relating to wellbeing, including an understanding of the diversity of the UK population and factors affecting different people’s wellbeing

Methodological 

  • Commitment to improving the use of evidence in driving public policy and practice and specifically to the principles of the What Works Centres 
  • Demonstrable commitment to spreading the use of high impact evaluation 

Financial management

  • Experience of financial management in an organisation of comparable size or larger
  • Proven ability to understand financial reports

Desired skills and expertise

Wellbeing

  • Expertise in one or more aspects of policy or practice relating to wellbeing e.g. work, learning, culture, sport, community, social capital, built/natural environment, governance, physical and mental health, heritage 
  • Experience of delivering wellbeing interventions and approaches   
  • Experience using services that contribute to wellbeing 

Cross sector, cross disciplinary and UK wide 

  • Relevant experience across the four countries of the UK
  • Relevant experience across public, private and VCSE sectors  

Business and organisational development 

  • Experience of running and growing an organisation including legal, commercial, operational, financial, communications 
  • Understanding of the principles and methods for successfully seeking funding from diverse sources

HOW TO APPLY

Applicants should prepare a short statement setting out their reasons for wishing to be considered for the role of Board Director/Treasurer and the skills/qualities they would bring to the organisation.  Statements should not exceed two pages in length and must be accompanied by a curriculum vitae. Applications should be sent by email for the attention of the Chair, Dr Paul Litchfield, at info@whatworkswellbeing.org by Sunday 2nd February 2020.

 

Tenders

Volunteering and Wellbeing - Rapid Evidence Assessment

INVITATION TO TENDER (ITT)

for a Rapid Evidence Assessment of Volunteering and Wellbeing

1. Background to the What Works Centre for Wellbeing

The primary mission of the What Works Centre for Wellbeing (WWCW) is to develop and share robust, accessible and useful evidence that governments, businesses, and communities can use to improve wellbeing across the UK. In this context, we aim to influence policy and community action by promoting the use of high quality and accessible evidence syntheses for better decisions.  

Traditionally, the Centre has conducted systematic evidence reviews to compare the effectiveness of different interventions or actions that affect wellbeing across different sectors, settings and populations. Across our work, we adopt the ONS definition of Personal Wellbeing, defined as:    

Wellbeing, put simply, is about ‘how we are doing’ as individuals, communities and as a nation and how sustainable this is for the future. […] Personal (or subjective) wellbeing is a particularly important dimension which we define as how satisfied we are with our lives, our sense that what we do in life is worthwhile, our day to day emotional experiences (happiness and anxiety) and wider mental wellbeing. (ONS, 2014)

Spirit of 2012 Trust

Spirit of 2012 Trust (Spirit) is the London 2012 legacy charity. Spirit invests in happiness by funding projects that enable people to be active, creative and connected.  Spirit fund arts and sports projects that foster greater community cohesion, empower those who are most under-served and challenge perceptions of disability.

Together the What Works Centre for Wellbeing and Spirit of 2012 are commissioning this research to bring together the evidence on the wellbeing impacts of volunteering. In particular, the findings are intended to be useful to charitable organisations that deliver volunteering interventions, as well as the funders and policy makers that support them.

2. Volunteering and wellbeing 

Around 40% of people in the UK volunteer at least once a year, with a quarter volunteering once a month. When considering informal volunteering – giving unpaid help to someone who is not a relative – over half of adults volunteer in this way every year. 

There is a broad and extensive body of research on the impacts of volunteering on important personal and social outcomes (particularly health, social relationships and skills), from a range of different disciplines. There is also some high-quality research on the impacts of volunteering and wellbeing from across the world and for different populations, but it has not yet been collated and synthesised in one place in a way that is useful for decision makers.

In particular, there is a need to synthesise the evidence around volunteering and wellbeing for a practitioner and policy audience – taking into account the changing trends and approaches to volunteering in the charitable sector, and different understandings of what constitutes volunteering.

Some of these changing trends and approaches deal with the role and responsibilities of volunteers (for example: shift- or task-oriented roles versus more unstructured social action- or social leadership-oriented roles). The changing understandings of volunteering may cover formal versus informal volunteering as well as remote or micro volunteering. 

There is a need to give useful information to practitioners and policy makers to help them design better volunteering opportunities, including what we know about key mechanisms that affect outcomes; which dosage or volunteering types may be most effective; and which groups benefit most from which types of volunteering.

3. What we are looking for 

We are commissioning a Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) to identify, collate and appraise the evidence on wellbeing impact of volunteering interventions. 

Compared to a systematic review, the rapid evidence assessment approach typically includes narrower questions with a less extensive review methodology. We welcome proposals that explore the criteria for how to deliver a feasible and meaningful research project on this topic.

One crucial aspect of the research will be the development of a theory of change for volunteering and wellbeing, which can be used to inform the research approach and reporting of findings. This will ensure that the outputs are informed by theory and rooted in approaches and pathways that are meaningful for practitioners and policy makers. 

The commissioned team of experts will set the basic parameters for study identification and inclusion criteria, under the guidance of our advisory panel of technical and thematic experts, including the WWCW and Spirit. Specifically, they will be expected to: 

  1. Refine the review questions by co-developing a theory of change to explore outcomes and pathways for impact 
  2. Develop inclusion and exclusion criteria for the collation of studies;
  3. Conduct data extraction and study appraisal;  
  4. Develop an approach for summarising and synthesising the findings. 
3.1 Research questions and approach

The commissioned team will be expected to adopt a clear, transparent and well-documented approach to the search, identification and synthesis of studies to answer the following research questions:

  1. What are the wellbeing impacts associated with volunteering? With particular attention to the distribution of effects across different adult populations.
  2. What are the key mechanisms by which wellbeing outcomes are achieved for volunteers, and are these generalisable across different contexts and people?
  3. What types of volunteering are particularly associated with wellbeing outcomes? Including the roles, amount, structured/unstructured or other characteristics.
  4. What are the barriers or enablers to improving wellbeing through volunteering? In particular, what are the organisational practices which can maximise wellbeing impact for volunteers. (For example in recruitment, management, progression, validation, etc)

 

3.2 Ways of working

We expect this project to include a design phase in which the WWCW and Spirit work with the commissioned team to review and refine the research questions and the theory of change, and agree inclusion criteria and methodology. There will also be an advisory panel of technical and thematic experts who will ensure quality assurance of the final outputs. The role and involvement of this panel will also be agreed at the initial stages of the project.

In order for the final outputs to be useful and accessible for an audience of practitioners and policy makers, we expect the commissioned team to work closely with the WWCW and Spirit on translation of the findings. We recognise that different aspects of this work may require different expertise, so are open to joint applications from multiple teams or organisations. 

We expect the proposal to explore the feasibility and trade off between different research questions or scope of the searches, and propose a pragmatic approach to the advisory panel and commissioning partners.

4. Deliverables 

The commissioned team will be expected to submit a technical report of findings, a plain-English executive summary aimed at a practitioner audience, and data extraction files of full search results.

5. Expected timetable 
Call for tender issued 8 January 2020
Deadline for receipt of tenders 9 February 
Short-listed candidate interviews and appointments Week of 17-21 February
Work to commence 1 March
Final deliverables to be submitted 31 July

6.
How to tender

If you would like to be considered to undertake the REA please detail your approach to addressing the following areas in no more than 3,000 words (excluding tables and references): 

  1. Your understanding of the brief and your proposed methodology and approach to the research (including your approach for searching, inclusion, data extraction and appraisal of the studies).  
  2. Your ability to carry out the proposed work, including relevant skills and demonstrable thematic and technical expertise of your team. 
  3. A project plan with milestones, key activities and deliverables, including the specific roles of your team members, and how you will work with the WWCW, Spirit of 2012 and the project advisory panel.  
  4. A budget, including a full breakdown of your proposed fees, identifying the day rate and seniority of members of staff assigned to each role. The proposed budget should not exceed £30,000, including all expenses, travel costs and VAT.
  5. A minimum of two examples of related work carried out by your team.
6.1 Assessment criteria 

Our criteria for assessing the tenders includes quality and price and is set out below: 

Assessment Criteria Weighting

Vision 

Understanding of the requirements for this Tender, including the specific objectives, audience and context. Compelling vision for the research. Alignment with the values of WWCW and Spirit.

10%

Proposed approach and methodology 

Clear, relevant and appropriate approach to the proposed work. Realistic and feasible staging and work plans. Rigorous and transparent approach. 

30%

Knowledge & expertise 

Demonstrable thematic and technical knowledge, skills and experience to meet the Tender’s requirements.

20%

Ways of working

Collaborative and open approach to working with WWCW, Spirit and the project advisory panel. Adherence to good practice GDPR, legislation and ethical guidelines.

20%

Value for money

With respect to total cost, full breakdown of fees and pricing structure. Balanced allocation of resources to work streams and phases of the project. Clear roles, day rates, number of days and balance of seniority levels in relation to proposed work.

20%

Please send your proposal with the subject line Submission for tender REA Volunteering and Wellbeing to: evidence@whatworkswellbeing.org no later than Sunday 9th February 2020.

If you have any questions, or would like to discuss this tender invitation please email evidence@whatworkswellbeing.org

Added 21/01/2020: For reasons of transparency and fairness, we are sharing questions received from potential applicants, along with our responses. The table below will be updated weekly, so please check back regularly for additions.

Question Answer
We expect the proposal to explore the feasibility and trade off between different research questions or scope of the searches, and propose a pragmatic approach to the advisory panel and commissioning partners.
Would you be able to unpack that comment for us please?
We know that the topic area, evidence base and research questions are broad and ambitious. We’d like the proposals to suggest how to approach this to ensure the project is feasible in the time and budget, and most likely to result in meaningful findings for the audiences.
Our preferred method of developing ToCs is to use workshops with key stakeholders. Is that something yourselves and colleagues from Spirit would be happy to engage in? Do you have examples of ToCs you have already developed that you could share? We would like the project Advisory Panel (made up of WWCW, Spirit, as well as thematic and methods experts) to work together with the research team on a ToC. A workshop is a good way of going about this, and the Advisory Panel know to expect this or a similar process. We don’t have any set way of developing a ToC, or any standard format for an end product. Some existing ToC for other research projects can be found in our evidence briefings of Visual Arts.
When it comes to disseminating findings to practitioners, we have successfully used conferences in the past. Would we need to fund an event out of the existing budget allocation, or would WWCW want to either fund that separately or allocate us a slot on an existing event? A conference or other stakeholder event would have to be funded from your project budget. However, the WWCW will cover the costs of developing basic products for the audiences, including an evidence briefing, slide set and blog. We envisage the research findings to have a long shelf life, and we think there will be many opportunities for WWCW and Spirit to incorporate them into future events, with the involvement of the research team. We would expect the project to focus on the research itself and on producing a plain-English summary of findings for future development of dissemination products.

Download the Terms & Conditions.