Resource round up and Centre update

During the election period we’re not publishing any new evidence, but we’ll still have a great line up of blogs, case studies and some useful resources to make sure you get your wellbeing evidence into practice  fix.

Workplace wellbeing
If you haven’t already downloaded it and posted it up on your office noticeboard (or whatever hi-tech equivalent you’re using), here’s our handy one-page factsheet on the latest evidence for wellbeing benefits at work.

And once that’s whetted your appetite, you can dip into our briefings on learning in the workplace and designing a good quality job.

Resilience in hospices and mental health in the media
It’s Mental Health Awareness Week, and we’re sharing two case studies that link with this year’s theme of surviving and thriving. Hospice UK give us an insight into a programme to improve staff wellbeing in an emotionally demanding environment. Meanwhile, Mind’s peer education for professionals is a look an an ambitious project that successfully challenged mental health stigma by training journalists.

Share your evaluations
We’ve currently got two calls for evidence live:

We will be putting out more calls throughout the year, and you can follow us on Twitter @whatworksWB for updates when these come out.

Other resources
You can find all of our evidence, research and guidance on the following themes:

Up next
After 8 June, here’s just a taster of what you can expect:

  • new evidence reviews on dance and sport and adult learning
  • guidance for community organisations on measuring personal wellbeing
  • a one-stop set of wellbeing indicators for local authorities
  • a round up of the evidence on green space and wellbeing
  • a discussion paper on community wellbeing.

 

 

 

 

Call for Evidence: Culture & Sport – Grey literature on wellbeing outcomes of music and singing

Evidence Call for Grey Literature for a systematic review of the wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults and the processes by which wellbeing outcomes are achieved.

By grey literature we mean “literature that is not formally published in sources such as books or journal articles” (Lefebvre, Manheimer, & Glanville, 2008, p. 106). This may be produced by charities, government departments, businesses, community groups and others; and may include reports, theses or dissertations, trials, and more.

In this instance we’re looking for evaluation reports.

We will accept for review and possible inclusion in our systematic review using the following criteria:C&S call for evidence (2)

  •  submissions must be evaluation reports only
  •  reports submitted must be completed in the past 3 years (2013-2016) and include
  • author details (individuals, groups or organisations)
  •  evaluation methods may be qualitative, quantitative methods or mixed methods
  •  the central report objective must be the evaluation of music or singing intervention

Please note the following condition for review of grey literature:

  •  Evidence can only be reviewed for inclusion in the work of the Culture and Sport programme if submitted through this call.
  • Evidence submitted to individual researchers in the programme cannot be considered.
  • If you have previously sent documents to the culture and sport team please re-submit through this call.

Please send your submissions to evidence@whatworkswellbeing.org  and include ‘Music and Singing Evidence’ in the subject line.

The deadline for submissions is the 10th June 2016

Please note additional invite for submission of primary data sets for review:

  •  Primary data sets used in submitted reports can also be submitted
  • Primary data may be qualitative or quantitative and in excel or word formats.
  • Please submit data sets directly to, or contact annette.payne@brunel.ac.uk for further information.

→discuss on our forum

 

Culture and sport public dialogues

Our public dialogues looked a the impact of drummingculture and sport on our wellbeing.

Here, participants from London share their thoughts in the excitement of culture and sport  

Culture and sport have an impact on our wellbeing by providing fun activities, enjoyment, friendship and a feeling of belonging.

Cultural and sporting activities are felt to be at the heart of quality of life, part of our way of life and core to social interactions. We learn, we take notice, we get active, we connect and we give. Most of all we develop our interests and with it our initiative and confidence.

  • We understand Culture  very broadly sport inspiredand beyond traditional arts and music
  • Spectating, participating and volunteering are all  equally valued.
  • Culture and sport help us through difficult times

→ See summary of the findings

→ Download full Culture and sport public dialogue report 

Public dialogues bring together members of the public and policy makers to discuss wellbeing and understand what matters to people.We spoke to a range of policy makers on:what works

  • why it’s important to talk about wellbeing
  • why are we talking about work and learning
  • about the value the centre can have across the UK
  • importance of dialogues with the public

→this week is National Museums and wellbeing week

 

Findings from UK wellbeing public dialogues and the Centre’s delivery plan

We have spoken with over 4,000 people and organisations, including many of you, to develop our plans and the areas for our evidence reviews and analysis.

This included six public dialogues across the UK – in Cardiff, South Tyneside, London, Belfast, Bristol and Falkirk –  in each of our initial evidence themes of Community, Work & Learning and Culture & Sport.  Public dialogues bring together members of the public and policy makers to discuss wellbeing and understand what matters to people.PDsummarycover

Today we published our public dialogue findings alongside feedback from people working on wellbeing and set out our first delivery plan until June 2018.

→ See today’s findings                                                                                       
Key to wellbeing are:

  • feeling safe, financially comfortable, good physical and mental health, good food, job, housing, natural environment and transport
  • feeling loved, respected and appreciated, belonging, positive connections,                   time alone, appreciation of difference and feeling part of something bigger
  • feeling fulfilled, achievement, inspiration, recognition, fun, learning,                     opportunity, control, agency and choice

→ Public dialogue reports and technical appendices

We are also publishing our delivery plan, along with the Community Voice of the User report and a short course on Wellbeing in Policy and Practice :

→Delivery plan

Community Voice of the user report

Wellbeing in Policy and Practice course

→Press release

 

Culture, museums and wellbeing

art gallery
Our evidence programme on Culture and Sport will help us to understand how we can improve wellbeing through cultural and sporting activities – involvement in music, visual arts, our leisure, heritage and physical activities.

→case study: If: Volunteering for wellbeing in the heritage sector 

There is a lot of interest in this area. Here are a few organisations and upcoming events:

→ Find out what they are doing – AESOP’s Dance to Health case study

 There a11059740_1616805768536236_8313541979095342044_nre thousands of museums for art and science around the world, but not one Museum of Happiness. We’d like to see museums where children and adults can enjoy and explore the art and science of happiness.

Shamash Aldina, co-founder Museum of Happiness

  book here 

 

 

Dance to Health through an evidence based intervention

WWCFWB blog - Cheshire Dance 2One of our evidence programmes is looking at the impact of  Culture and Sport on wellbeing, a key element of this will be participation in cultural and sporting activities.

Our newest pioneer case study is from Tim Joss, founder of AESOP, a social enterprise  (‘arts enterprise with  social purpose’) who are kicking off Dance to Health : 10 pilots to deliver fall-prevention exercises to older people through group dance.

→ be one of our wellbeing pioneers