Wellbeing in higher education

This resource brings together, and builds on, the evidence base for improving wellbeing in higher education. Scroll down to find out more.

University of Worcester ‘Suicide Safer’ Project

In 2014, University of Worcester established a multi-agency ‘Suicide Safer’ Project inviting University staff, County Council Public Health, NHS Trust and third sector organisations to develop a multi-faceted suicide prevention model to contribute to a ‘Suicide safer’ University and, in a phased plan, to a ‘Suicide safer’ City and County as an active partner in the Local Authority Mental Wellbeing and Suicide Prevention Plan.

A warmer welcome: Derby University

Changing typical ‘service induction’ sessions at Derby University to run workshops to increase belonging changed the way students felt about accessing services.

This is the first in a series of pioneer examples, so be sure to sign up in the section below to receive new examples when they’re available.

A coordinated collaborative approach to wellbeing: KCLSU

In October 2016, the Wellbeing Coordinator role was created at King’s College London Students’ Union (KCLSU) with funding support from King’s College London. This case study, written by Julia Haas, KCLSU Wellbeing Coordinator, outlines her role in developing a happier and healthier student community.

Know before you go: Mental health and transitions into university

Student Minds CEO Rosie Tressler met with Canadian organisation TeenMentalHealth.Org and learned of the success of their evidence based resources that were supporting students with this vulnerable transition period. Read Rosie’s interview and what steps Student Minds took to incorporate the findings.

MOVING FROM COUNSELLING-ONLY TO WELLBEING SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS: BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY

In 2014 Bournemouth University decided to review the Student Counselling service provision it offered on campus to deliver a better and more holistic service for students. It worked with Dorset Healthcare University Foundation Trust, who had previously provided the counselling service to reconfigure the operating model. The Student Wellbeing service came into being in 2015.

University wellbeing practice map

This map shows the current practice examples for higher education. Contact us to tell us about what your university is doing to improve wellbeing.

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WE’RE CARRYING OUT RESEARCH TO BUILD THE EVIDENCE BASE.

Take 10 seconds to sign up and receive updates as soon as new evidence and case studies emerge. Topics we’ll be reviewing include: loneliness; local service integration; institutional community wellbeing; and further education  and other learning institutions.

How can you take evidence-informed action?

Across our lives

The biggest drivers of adult wellbeing (16 years and up) are:

  1. Emotional and physical health
  2. Partner relationship
  3. Employment

Find out more about the Centre’s work on lifelong wellbeing

Culture and sport

Mental health treatment, early intervention

Learning

Evidence from the What Works Centre for Wellbeing:

Evidence from other sources:

Financial wellbeing and capability

Evaluating

YOUNGER ADULTS EXPERIENCE POORER MENTAL HEALTH, LONELINESS AND UNEMPLOYMENT

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), compared to older people, young people in the UK (broadly from 16 to 24) are more likely to:

REPORT more SYMPTOMS OF MENTAL ILL HEALTH

REPORT LONELINESS MORE FREQUENTLY

FEEL THEY HAVE NO-ONE TO RELY ON OR A SENSE OF BELONGING IN THEIR NEIGHBOURHOOD

BE MORE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE

HAVE HIGHER RATES OF UNEMPLOYMENT

be MORE SATISFIED WITH THEIR PHYSICAL HEALTH

This matters both at an individual level and for society as a whole, in terms of how well we will be able to sustain high levels of national wellbeing into the future.

Who’s affected?

What are you doing to improve wellbeing?

Tell us what about your projects, activities and policies that aim to improve wellbeing within universities. It could be the first steps of a trial, or an established approach with proven results. Get in touch and we’ll follow up to fin[[d out what worked, what the learning was, and how other universities could take it forward.

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